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Sunday, September 17, 2017

1855. Windows 10 Start Menu

I am an old school Windows user. With Windows 10 can I get to some of the old Start Menu features?

The first thing to do is to Right Button Click on the Windows key. Most people don't realize this option. When you do this you will get a pop-u menu selection of many of the options you want like. Task Manager, File Search, System, Network Connections, Computer Management are all there.

If you want the simple Start menu from Windows 7 days. there are many options for you to change the way the Windows key works.

Do a simple search for "Windows 10 Start Menu options". I guarantee you find something to satisfy your needs. There are links in our blog as well. Windows 10 is here and you should take advantage of the new as well as old features.

http://bgr.com/2015/07/29/windows-10-start-menu-how-to-customize/


1854. Wibdows 10 update goes wrong

Windows 10 update goes wrong. Is there anything in the windows update to make this easy to backout the update?

if after installing the Windows 10 Creators Update v1703 you are facing problems and issues with it, you can uninstall it and go back or rollback to the previous Windows version 1607.

To uninstall Windows 10 Creators Update you will have to open the Start Menu. Next, click on the Settings link.

Having opened the Settings panel, click on Update and security and here select Recovery settings.

Next click on the Get started button under Go back to an earlier build section.

The process will start and you will be asked series of questions.

Be safe make an image backup first!!

1853. Network Solutions: Safe email?

Is Network Solutions email virus protection really working? :

I have seen email viruses on emails from many different email providers. Network solutions is not necessarily any better or worse than others.

I have had a recent experience with an email received via Network Solutions. It contained an attachment that had a .VBS extension. It was definitly a virus.

No matter who is handling your email, if the attachment is any of the executable types, like .exe, .com, and .vbs don't open them.

And if you don't know the person sending the email don't open them.

You can usually set your email program like Thunderbird or Outlook to not even allow you to receive emails with those attachment types. Be careful. Save the attachment to disk and scan it with your antivirus program. If you don't, don't open it!

1852. Email attachments - virus.

I have heard that you can get viruses attached to an email. How does this happen. Solutions: Safe email? file attachments: Spreading viruses

If you think you've received an email message with an attachment containing a virus, please make sure that you do not open the attachment.

To check a file attachment for a virus, you'll need to first save the file to your computer and then scan the file with antivirus software. Don't open the attachment - Save it.

Most viruses are delivered through an email attachment. Attachments that contain viruses are either executable programs (file types: .com, .exe, .vbs, .zip, .scr, .dll, .pif, .js) or macro viruses (file types: .doc, .dot, .xls, .xlt).

The safest way to avoid them is to not open email attachments. To be real safe if you don't know the person sending the email or if you know them, and weren't expecting the email, check with them first.

1851. Wireless charging

Can I use wireless charging on my phone?

Wireless charging has been around for a good few years now, but it's fair to say it is yet to take off to sky-high heights. As with any fresh technology, standards needed to be set, technology developed and ultimately pushed out to consumers.

Now though Apple is getting in on the scene, with its flagship iPhone X, plus the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus smartphones coming with wireless charging capabilities.

That could give it the shot in the arm needed to widen its appeal. Before you splash out on a wireless charger, though, make sure that your phone supports it. Loads of phones do now, from the iPhone X to the Galaxy S8 to the LG G6. For some smartphones, you need to buy a special replacement back or a case that enables wireless charging.

You also have to check that the wireless phone charger you choose is the right standard for your device. So do some checking to make sure your phone will work with wireless chargers.

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

1845. Print to PDF in Windows 10

I have Windows 10 installed on my computer, and I need to create PDF files from my Microsoft Word documents. I’ve been told I can do this, but I can’t figure out how. Can you help?

For those who have somehow missed this, a PDF (Portable Document Format) file is a (mostly) read-only format for sharing and presenting information. You can create documents in Microsoft Word, for example, and share them with people that don’t have a copy of Microsoft Word by sending a recipient a PDF-format version of the document. Almost everyone has installed the Adobe Reader (free software that can display PDF files), and even those that haven’t can use most any modern browser to display the contents of the file. In other words, sending a PDF file as an attachment to an email message is a relatively safe way to ensure that just about anyone can view and read your document.

In versions of Windows prior to Windows 10, it wasn’t easy to create PDF files—you were required to download and install special printer drivers that would allow you to print documents to PDF format. Now, in Windows 10, the feature is finally built into the operating system. Anyone running Windows 10 can create a PDF from any application that allows printing, including Microsoft Word.

To do this, start printing your document, as if you were going to print it to a printer. (Pressing Ctrl+P normally works, in Windows.) Look at the list of available printers. You’re looking for the printer named Microsoft Print to PDF. Select that printer (rather than your normal, default printer). Once you do, you’ll be asked to supply a file name, and once you do, the software will “print” your document to a PDF file and save it where you indicated.
Mac users should note that this feature has been available since, well, almost forever (as long as we can recall, anyway). When you start to print a document, select the PDF dropdown list in the lower-left corner of the Print dialog box, and you’ll see various options dealing with printing to a PDF file. Couldn’t be easier! And now Windows 10 handles the job in much the same way.

1846. OPening Mac Apps from Unidentified Developers

I was looking for a specialized file management utility for my Mac, and found it online. I downloaded it, and when I tried to run it, I got an error that said it couldn’t be opened because it was from an unidentified developer. Do I have to do something special to use this utility?

You can generally find any application you need in the Mac App Store, and all applications distributed through the App Store come from “identified” developers. You’ll never see this error with an application you find in the App Store. The problem is that not all applications available come to you through the App Store, and if you want to run one of those applications, it seems that you’ve run up against a brick wall here.

The problem is that Mac OS X, in its efforts to “sandbox” applications so that it’s difficult for you to install and run an application that could harm your computer or your data, also makes it difficult to run some applications that you might want to run. If you’re sure you have a safe application, there is an easy workaround, however.
The solution: Rather than double-clicking an application to run it, the first time you run it, you must right-click on it and select Open. Starting it this way displays the same dialog box you saw previously, except this time, the dialog box offers you the option to open the application.

The dialog box also tells you where the application came from, to help you verify that it is, in fact, the application you were hoping to open.

Once you take this extra step, you’ll never have to do it again—it’s a one-time-only thing. But the extra layer of protection is there for a reason, and helps to protect you from running malware inadvertently.

1847. Sign a PDF Document on an iPhone

Occasionally, I get PDF files attached to email messages that require my signature. At this point, I print the document, sign it, scan it back into a PDF file, and attach it to an email response to the sender. What a pain! Is there some easier way to do this?

Yes, your workflow can work, and it’s the way people have signed documents for years.

The current operating system on your iPhone, starting with iOS 9, makes this really easy. You don’t need to print the document, and you don’t need to scan it back into digital format. Instead, you can take advantage of iOS Mail’s markup capabilities.

When you receive an email message with a read-only document, such as an image or a PDF file, you can use the markup tools to highlight regions, magnify regions, add text, or insert a signature into the document.
To test this “magic,” find an email message that has an attached PDF file (or send yourself one to test with). Once you receive the message, tap on the PDF file to view it. Tap on the “toolbox” icon in the lower-right corner of the screen. This action creates a reply to the original message with the PDF file attached, and allows you to modify the contents.

In Markup mode, click the first icon at the bottom of the screen to highlight content in the PDF file.
Click the second icon to zoom specific regions for emphasis.
Click the third toolbar icon to insert a text box. Inside the new text box, enter any text you’d like to see on the returned document.

Finally (the reason you asked the question), click the fourth icon to insert a signature. If you have previously used this feature, iOS will suggest an existing signature, but you can also add or remove signatures. Once you have added a new signature, if necessary, tap it to insert it into the PDF file.

When you’re done marking up the PDF file, click Done in the upper-right corner of the editor. The iOS Mail app creates a reply message for you, with the marked-up document attached. Click Send as normal, and your recipient will receive your marked up/signed document. What could be easier?

1848. Permanently Delete an E-Book from Kindle Account

I read books on my Android phone at the gym, using Amazon’s Kindle application. I have some books on my phone that I read years ago, and I’d like to get rid of them. I tried deleting them from my device, but they still show up in my Amazon account. How can I remove them from my device and permanently remove them from my account? I’m not going to read them again!

This has frustrated me, as well. It’s nice to be able to carry around a bunch of books on our devices, but once we’re done with some of them, we would love to have them disappear.

Note that this discussion applies to any device that runs the Kindle app, including the actual Amazon Kindle devices, as well. It’s easy to delete content from your device: Find the title you want to remove, tap and hold on the title, and then select Remove from Device from the context menu. This action deletes the content from your device, but leaves it in your Kindle account.

If you want to completely remove the book from your Kindle account, you’ll need to take a few more steps. To do this, you’ll need to use a Web browser, and this is easier on a large screen like a desktop or laptop computer than it is on a device with a small screen. Log into your Amazon account, and select Manager your content and devices. On this page, you’ll see a list of all your Kindle books.

Find the book you want to delete, and click the button with three dots to the left of the book title. In the pop-up menu, select Delete. You get one chance to confirm your deletion, so think twice before clicking. If you accidentally delete a book, you’ll need to pay for it again if you decide to re-read it. So take this action seriously!

1850. What’s the Difference between DOC and DOCX files, and Which Should I Use?

When working with documents created with Microsoft Word, I see files with a .DOC extension, and others with a .DOCX extension. What’s the difference? And should I prefer one over the other when I’m creating documents?

This is an important question, and a seemingly simple question; unfortunately, it has a long and complex answer.
It may seem odd that Microsoft Word has two associated file extensions, but there’s a history here. When Microsoft first released Word, it stored the contents of the document in a file with the extension .DOC. The resulting file that you stored on disk contained information that was proprietary to Microsoft, and its exact format was private, difficult to work with, and fragile.

Microsoft did document the format, so that other applications could read and write files in Microsoft Word format, but it wasn’t easy. In addition, if a .DOC file was damaged on disk, perhaps as part of a transfer, it was ruined.
In 2007, Microsoft revised the file format. Microsoft Word files were now stored in a standard ZIP file format, the file format was simple to understand and document, and any application could easily create files that Microsoft Word could load. To discern between the old-style files and the new ones, Microsoft changed the default file extension from .DOC to .DOCX.

The main advantages of the new format are that it is far easier to repair a damaged .DOCX file because of the way it’s stored on disk, and that a given .DOCX file is generally far smaller than the corresponding .DOC file would be. This makes storing and transferring/emailing .DOCX files easier.

Which should you use? Clearly, the .DOCX format is simpler, safer, and smaller. Given the choice, use it.
By the way, it’s worth noting that Microsoft made similar changes for Excel and PowerPoint documents in 2007: .XLS files because .XLSX, and .PPT files became .PPTX files. In each case, the new file format is smaller and safer, and you should use them if possible.

1849. Handle Windows Payment Scam

I got a call from a relative this morning: He was looking at a screen on Windows that said that his computer had been compromised, and he needed to call an 800 number and pay a fee to get his computer fixed. I told him not to pay; was that the right answer?

Our watch word around here is often "I hate computers", but hearing this my new one is "I hate people". Obviously someone wrote some scam that tried to convince your relative that he needed to pay some money to fix his computer. Now there is a bit of malware going around that a lot of people have heard about that encrypts all the data on your computer. And that's not this one this is just a very simple scam that hopes it will scare you into calling and paying money for no reason whatsoever.

This scam does lock up your computer and you can't type anything and you can't reboot but the answer is simple. You pull the plug your reboot is back up and everything is fine. This is actually happened to me more than once as well.

So if you get a message that indicates that your computer is broken and you need to pay money to fix it. Disregard it pull the plug and restart the computer. Most of the time that will completely fix the problem. On the other hand it can't hurt to run some software like MalwareBytes which is free software available on the web that can verify that you don't have any malware on your computer. But you should not ever pay the cash.